Tag Archives: videogames

Hitting the Streets of Rage!

sega logoSo, this weekend I dusted off the old HateBox and decided it was time to actually do some serious retrogaming. I’m not sure if that’s what Queen Victoria wanted, but I imagine she would have supported my decision. So, this weekend I took a poke a beloved trilogy of games from the era of the 16bit wars, the Streets of Rage collection. This was the seminal series of side scrolling beat ’em ups for the Sega Genesis, and at the time of their release, were actually quite advanced, particularly for the music in numbers two and three.


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Pokemon Gets On Side

Pokemon_logoMy first encounter with the apparently unstoppable juggernaut that is Pokémon came when I was working graveyard shifts at the local Tim Horton’s, and was coming home to less than stellar television programme selection. It was 1998, and it was a decent-ish cartoon that was on at the right time, so I watched as I ate dinner at eight in the morning. I vaguely knew there was a game for it, but it wasn’t until deploying to Bosnia in 1999 that I picked a Game Boy Color that was packaged with “Pokémon Yellow”. I was hooked.
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Gaming While Coloured

POCGamer GrenadeAs a person of colour (POC, sometimes people instead of person), gaming can be a sometimes frustrating experience. In addition to the usual issues all gamers have, like finding time, and getting schedules to match up, there are other issues. Problems that are coming under increasing scrutiny, and that are becoming a subject of often vitriolic discourse both online and offline.

One of the key issues at hand is that POC are increasing tired of the hackneyed and stereotyped representations of themselves (and by extension, other ethnic groups and minorities) in gaming, and also of the frequent occurrences of racism by omission. As a population that is increasing in size and in consumption of games (both tabletop and video), its understandable that we would like to see ourselves represented a bit more often, and in less negative portrayals and roles.
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