Category Archives: Uncategorized

Top 3 Indie Rules-Lite RPGs

There’s some definite misunderstandings around rules-lite RPGs, the main one being that they’re only good for one-shots or short campaigns. This is untrue and has been since 1974. Yes, there’s absolutely games that are built around being one-shots; and many of those are definitely rules-lite. But OD&D was very rules-lite and there are still people playing long-term campaigns based on it, so what are some modern options? This is my in no particular order top three rules-lite indie RPG list!

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The Overview Review of Lost Omens: The Mwangi Expanse

In 2009, after being abandoned by Wizards with the end of 3.5e D&D, Paizo Publishing released Pathfinder. In 2019, they launched Pathfinder 2nd Edition; and unlike its D&D origin, Pathfinder focused on a single world, Golarion. Golarion was everything that Wizards now says doesn’t work for a campaign setting. It has a detailed history. It drips lore. There are canonical results for things. And the fans love it. The new edition carries this forward, with the Lost Omens series of books that add more detail to the setting and bring it howling into the 2nd Edition. Last fall, Paizo was kind enough to provide me with an electronic copy of Lost Omens: The Mwangi Expanse. I’m done reading it now, so let’s dig into this book!

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Gods of Egypt, the same old story

No, just, no.

No, just, no.

“Here we go again.”

That was the thought that tore through my mind when I saw the posters for “Gods of Egypt”. In typical fashion, the movie houses involved and casting decisions had placed the vast majority (five of six) of roles in the hands of white actors and actresses, with a token Black actor as Thoth. Coming rapidly on the heels of the Noah and Exodus, films lambasted for their whitewashing, this film carries on the long tradition of making POC white. I’ve talked about this in the past, and the problem remains as much as it ever has, but why, even with so much outcry? [1][2]
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Diversity Fail by Marvel (Again)

marvel logoIn comics, when something needs to be changed in a character who has already been established for whatever reason, it’s called a retcon. This is short for “retroactive continuity”, and it comes in two broad flavours, hard and soft. DC favours hard reset retcons that rebooted the entire universe, and until recently, Marvel preferred soft ones that occurred in book. Until recently, I preferred the soft ones too, since when I saw them previously, they were used to gently “bump” things to help keep the system on track. For example, Professor X was turned into a Vietnam veteran from a Korean War veteran to bump the X-Men forward in time because the Marvel Universe doesn’t deal well with the passage of time (the original X-Men should all be in their sixties, and Iron Man should be well into his seventies or early eighties). I’m writing about this because comic books are an easily accessed medium for people interested in SFF.
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